Office cuisine

He who can’t get bacon, must be content with cabbage!


Say the Danes. I say: skip the bacon no matter what and go straight for cabbage. Why? We will get to that soon, but first let’s have a look at how it all began…

Unlike our previous plant celebrities, buckwheat, apple, cinnamon and potato, cabbage is a plant that originates from Europe. Today, it’s wild ancestors can still be seen standing strong against the rough weather on cliffs across Great Britain. Humans domesticated cabbage some 2000 years ago and by the middle ages it conquered European cuisine.

Who goes bananas for cabbage today? Russians stand unchallenged on the throne of cabbage lovers with their 20 kilograms per person per year, followed by the  Belgians with 4.7 kg and the Dutch 4 with kilograms.

Which is not so surprising, for the plant has several qualities, valuable both for farmers and consumers. Firstly, cabbage is very rewarding when it comes to yields – one cabbage head can weigh up to 4 kilograms. That means a whole lot of cabbage, if you consider that you can grow up to 45000 heads per hectare. Speaking of heads, did you know that the name cabbage comes from the French word caboche, which means head?

Secondly, the plant is not demanding to cultivate. Moreover, it is perfect to grow in colder conditions (it thrives easily at 4,5 degrees Celsius) and is frost resistant. Last but not least, it stores really well over longer periods.

Thirdly, it can enrich your diet in several ways. Be it pickled, fermented or plain raw, cabbage can be a good addition to almost any meal. Why? A 100 grams of this white, green or even purple vegetable will satisfy over 20 % of your organisms demand for vitamin C, B and K. Low on fat and with only 25 kilo-calories per 100 grams, cabbage is also perfect for getting rid of those extra kilograms in a healthy fashion. And not just that. Research suggests that cabbage may even protect you from colon cancer.

Don’t get carried away with this crunchy and sour delight though. Too much cabbage can cause unease in the belly department – bloating and flatulence. Not the best qualities for social interactions, especially a date.

So, what are you waiting for? Get inspired by our recipes, chop the cabbage and get cooking. Just make sure you don’t overcook it – unless, of course, you prefer the smelly sensation.

Recipes from the office:

Written by: Aljaž Malek

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This entry was written by yeefoodblog and published on March 21, 2017 at 16:51. It’s filed under Plant profile and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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